Saturday 19th Jan 2019

Metal Detectives Group & Leisure Promotions

1st dig of 2019

250+ acres of cultivated ground in Deddington - Oxfordshire

Some new undetected ground


Between the villages of Deddington and Clifton lies our search fields, opposite some of the search fields on the other side of the road lies the castle ruins.

We have 100 acres of new land and 170 acres of land previously searched by the MDG /LP where some great finds were made.
Some of the site starts at one end of the village of deddington almost opposite the castle and runs along the road down to the village of Clifton, until the Metal Detectives visit the site has been undetected.

Finds from the 1st visit to some of the fields here produced a wide array of finds from Iron Age coinage and artefacts, Roman coins & Artefacts , medieval and more modern.

To see some of the finds made, fields conditions etc check out Idetect’s short vid from the dig :




The history of Deddington is plentiful, please see below.

DEDDINGTON HISTORY / INFORMATION & INTERESTING FACTS

Evidence of an Iron Age hill-fort at Ilbury, and the discovery of Romano-British remains east and north east of the Oxford road, suggest that there has probably been a substantial settlement hereabouts since prehistoric times. By the 6th or 7th century, considerable agricultural development must have taken place, followed by the establishment of the "tun" (place) of Daeda's people in the 10th century. Practically nothing is known about these pre-Conquest years. By 1086, at the time of the Domesday Book, Deddington and Clifton consisted of 36 hides.

There was a 10 hide estate and 1 further hide at Hempton, while Ilbury was 1 hide and 1 virgate. A hide equalled 100 to 120 acres, and was originally considered an area of land sufficient to support a family. A virgate was a variable measure of no fixed size. There were then perhaps 500 inhabitants of the parish, mostly employed in agriculture.

Hempton and Clifton each had its own mill, and there were two at Deddington. The arable land had a high annual value for the time. Bishop Odo of Bayeux, half-brother of William the Conqueror, reserved just over half that land for his own profit.



The Early Years
Deddington seems to have been settled by the 6th or 7th century. Its name at that time is not known, but Daeda, who gave the place its present name (which means Daeda's 'tun', or settlement), lived much later, possibly in the 10th century. The last known Saxon lord of the place before the Conquest was Brihtwine. Brihtwine's house was almost certainly on the site later occupied by the castle[2] built shortly after the Conquest by its new Norman lord, the powerful warrior-bishop Odo of Bayeux, half-brother of the Conqueror. Odo, who was granted enormous estates across England, is best known today as commissioner of the famous Bayeux tapestry. Following Odo's rebellion in 1086, Deddington was seized by King William. It was at that time one of the largest and most valuable estates in the county.

The Middle Ages
By the 12th century Deddington had come into the ownership of the de Chesney family, who were almost certainly responsible for the shift of the settlement's focus westwards, away from the castle to Philcote Street, the Market Place, and New Street. The late 12th and early 13th century was a great period for creating new towns, and the de Chesneys laid out what were called burgages for occupation by merchants. Deddington never really matured as an urban community, but something of the character of a town has always adhered to it. By the end of the 14th century, the castle had largely gone.

One of Deddington's medieval rectors was Aymer de Valence (d. 1260), wealthy half-brother of King Henry III. Aymer, whose livings included the bishopric of Winchester, is unlikely to have devoted much time to Deddington.


There must have been great excitement in Deddington at the arrival in June 1312 of Piers Gaveston, one of the most powerful men in the kingdom. He had risen to eminence through the favouritism of his lifelong friend King Edward II. Immensely gifted and capable of great charm, he nevertheless alienated the greatest barons in the land by his arrogance and tactlessness. He had surrendered in Yorkshire to the Earl of Pembroke on the promise of his life and was being brought south when he was lodged in Deddington's rectory house 2 (now Castle House). Here he was seized by his implacable enemy, the Earl of Warwick, who carried him off to be beheaded at Blacklow Hill, near his town and castle of Warwick. Gaveston's brief and tragic visit is commemorated by Piers Row and Gaveston Gardens, off the Hempton Road.

Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
William Billing (d. 1533), a wool merchant trading through Calais, was one of the richest men in this whole area. His damaged monument survives in the north aisle of the parish church[3].

Sir Thomas Pope (1507-59), Tudor courtier and founder of Trinity College, Oxford, was reputedly born in Leadenporch House 4 in New Street. His great fortune, which stemmed from his profitable position as administrator of the revenues of monasteries suppressed by his master Henry VIII, enabled him to buy Wroxton (north of Banbury) for a country seat as his family rose inexorably into the peerage and out of Deddington.

During the Civil War, Deddington's position on the road between royalist Oxford and parliamentarian Banbury involved it more than it can have liked in troop movements and skirmishes in the area. Troops were frequently quartered here, and in August 1644 King Charles I slept here, probably at Castle House 2. In 1649 Leveller troops, their radical politics a source of alarm even to their own officers, were quartered in Deddington. In those troubled times the maintenance of local institutions and business was in the hands of dedicated officials such as Edward Kempster (d. 1676), who was not only Deddington's registrar and parish clerk but also its schoolmaster, teaching in the schoolroom in the parish church.

Sir William Scroggs (1623-83), Lord Chief Justice, was reputedly born in Deddington. He is notorious for his partiality and cruelty during the Popish Plot trials inspired by Titus Oates in 1678.

The Fardon family, Quakers and clockmakers, worked in Deddington from the early 18th century. Examples of their work are still to be found. The clock in the tower of the parish church, though made by Taylor's of Oxford, was installed by Thomas Fardon (d. 1838) in 1833.

Deddington had its own short-lived newspaper in the mid-19th century, the North Oxfordshire Monthly Times, published from 1849 to about 1860 by local printer J.S. Hirons.

The Mason family, locksmiths and ironmongers in Deddington since the late 17th century, established an axletree factory around 1820. They acquired such a reputation for quality as to attract orders to supply axles for royal coaches, including Queen Victoria's coronation coach; indeed, it was the firm's boast that hardly a crowned head in Europe but rode in state above its axles. Mason's employed up to 80 people in the later l9th century, but in about 1896 the patent was sold to Walker's of Wednesbury, and the business closed. Its site is now occupied by the Royal British Legion[5] in the High Street.


The successful joiner's and builder's business of Robert Franklin (d. 1864) in Chapel Square was turned by his sons H.R. and W. Franklininto a firm with an international reputation for high-quality restoration work on church and college buildings in London, Salisbury, Oxford and elsewhere. Abroad, their contracts included the pulpit and chancel screen of Hobart Cathedral, Tasmania, Australia, where they are still to be seen. Henry Robert Franklin lived at Castle House[2] and William at The Blocks (now Featherton House)[6].

At their height the Franklin workshops employed as many as 200 skilled masons and woodcarvers. The firm closed in 1917. The site is now



Field names of Deddington Map: http://www.deddingtonhistory.uk/clubs,societiesandorganisation/mapgroup/fieldsandfarmsmap



DIG COST: £ 15 FOR MDG & LP MEMBERS & £20 FOR NON MDG/LP MEMBERS

BURGER VAN WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE TO PROVIDE HOT & COLD FOOD AND DRINKS FOR US ALL.

LEISURE PROMOTIONS WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE TO TAKE CARE OF ALL YOUR METAL DETECTING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

DIG PARKING: ALONG TRACKWAY

DIG ARRIVAL : 8.15AM

DIG BRIEFING : 9.25AM

DIG START : 9.30 AM

DIG FINISH : 16.00 PM

FINDS WILL BE RECORDED FROM 13.00PM UNTIL DIG FINISH AT 16.00 PM



DIG DIRECTIONS WILL BE SENT OUT ON THURSDAY EVENING / FRIDAY MORNING ( IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE DIG DIRECTIONS PLEASE CHECK YOUR JUNK MAIL, IF STILL NO DIRECTIONS PLEASE EMAIL This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. TO INFORM THE ADMIN OF THE ISSUE)

PLEASE MAKE SURE IF YOU ATTEND THIS DIG YOU ARE ABLE TO DIG AND FILL HOLES PROPERLY, REMOVE YOUR UNWANTED FINDS AND RUBBISH FROM THE SITE/FIELDS & RECORD YOUR FINDS WITH US FOR THE FINDS REPORTS.

SEE YOU ON SATURDAY 19TH. 

 

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